Chengdu Aerospace Superalloy Technology Campus / Tanghua Architect & Associates

Complex Building Interior

Complex Building Interior

  • Architects: Tanghua Architect & Associates
  • Location: Xihanggang Ave South Extend Line 2999, Shuangliu Xian, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
  • Architect In Charge: Hua Tang
  • Design Team: Xin Liu, Peng Shao, Shuai Shao, Liu Liu, Ning Yang, Shijiin Ma, Sicong Wang, Fang Deng, Tianhao Wang, Zemin Wang etc.
  • Area: 291253.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Zhenghuan He, Arch-exist
  • Design Institute: Xinjiang Academy of Building Research Co., Ltd.
  • Interior Design: Tanghua Architect & Associates, Turen Design
  • Landscape Design : Caohui (Singapore) Design Consultants
  • Client: Chengdu Aerospace Superalloy Technology Co., Ltd

Landscape

Landscape

From the architect. The project is located in Tianfu New Area, Chengdu, inside the Southwest Airport Economic Development Zone. Being 14 km away from Shuangliu International Airport, it is part of the New Chengdu Energy Industry District Planning. The project is east to Chengya Highway and west to South Chuanchi Road, an extension area. The site still remains the forestry texture which is unique to Chengdu Plain. The forestry texture is formed mostly by agricultural lands and fish ponds with small settlements and forests scattering in-between. Due to that, our design focuses on how to meet the restricted sloping and elevation requirement inside the project. We also try to preserve most of the unique landform and topography from Chengdu Plain.

Layout

Layout

Reception Center 1F

Reception Center 1F

When planning the programs and phasing of the site, we choose different topographic manipulation strategies based on their various functions: For the office, exhibition and reception area, we maintain the original topography, using the existing landscape elements to design these areas. The existing fish pond becomes the central water feature after the design. We also maintain most of the original planting without interfering the construction. The strategy is to transfer them into series of various terrace landscape merging into the topography. For warehouses and R&D areas, considering the craftsmanship requirement and smooth topography, we decide to use hardscape to serve the purpose of full function, using rank vegetation as main landscape planting. We also control the height of the vegetation to not block the view and maintain the efficiency of transportation.

Entrance

Entrance

The complex building locates in the north-western corner of the site, extending itself along the South Chuanchi road in a holistic, clean style with tube shaped cantilever structure. We choose the west side of the project as main iconic showing area, meanwhile controlling its sunshine angle. The north side of the project is used as an expert reception area. It has convenient traffic access to the complex building and connects itself to the urban main vehicular road. This area has a low impact on construction development, where maintains the original topography and landscape. The north-eastern corner of the site is relatively flat, which is used as R&D center and factory warehouses. The rest of the warehouses are located in the south of the site which is in the phase two construction.

Entrance

Entrance

Complex Building

The complex building undertakes most of the office, information sharing and display. The needs for image displaying also impact its architecture design. Steel truss structure forms a tube-shaped space cantilevered in the west side of the side, facing the main urban avenue. It lays down a basic design style of light and dynamic. Inside the east side of the building is the main office area while the west side becomes the meeting room, open space and exhibition hall using the triangle space. At the same time, the panel system on the west side also filters both the sunlight and view.

Complex Building

Complex Building

Complex Building Interior

Complex Building Interior

Chuanxi Club

This area is divided into two parts: the first part is gathering area with reception and meeting rooms, another part is courtyard area with recreation and entertainment. This area has its own independent entrance and exit. Besides the front reception, the gathering area also serves as a connection to the office and reception area. It is interpreted into a collective and holistic image.

Complex Buidling Interior

Complex Buidling Interior

Reception Center Diagram

Reception Center Diagram

Staff Canteen

The staff canteen locates near the demarcation of phase one and two with its main entrance facing the factory area. Its red line reacts to the orientation and angles of the phasing demarcation. In terms of the layout, we use the existing depression to form a semi-underground space. At the same time, water is introduced to the interior space after manipulation. As the main entrance water feature, it forms an atmosphere of forestry canteen through different landscape elements.

Interior

Interior

Staff Dormitory

The staff dormitory uses its internal courtyard, landscape and corridor to connect different site levels. Following its program, it represents a simple yet modernism faade design.

Courtyard

Courtyard

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“Campus of the Digital Age”: Cornell Tech Officially Debuts on Roosevelt Island in New York

Cornell Tech Campus. Image  Iwan Baan

Cornell Tech Campus. Image Iwan Baan

The innovative Cornell Tech campus has officially opened on New York City‘s Roosevelt Island. Master planned by SOM and featuring buildings and landscapes by Morphosis, Weiss/Manfredi, Handel Architects,and James Corner Field Operations, the campus represents a new vision of a campus for the digital age. Two years after breaking ground in 2015, the campus now houses some of the most environmentally-friendly and energy-efficient buildings in the world.

Cornell Tech Campus. Image  Iwan Baan

Cornell Tech Campus. Image Iwan Baan

Driven by principles of collaboration and innovation, the master plan is arranged as create a place that is both separate from and integrated into the city, providing students with a calming atmosphere that is closely linked to New York‘s entire city of resources.

We felt strongly that the framework should stimulate invention – both architectural and scientific. We designed a campus framework that would encourage the creative process now and into the future, flexibly accommodating a growing and evolving institution, said Colin Koop, Senior Designer on the project and a Director at SOM.

Arranged within this plan are three main structures: The Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Center, The Bridge, and The House.

The Bloomberg Center / Morphosis. Image  Matthew Carbone for Morphosis

The Bloomberg Center / Morphosis. Image Matthew Carbone for Morphosis

Designed by Morphosis, the Bloomberg Center is the first academic building on campus, featuring a variety of re-thought learning spaces including both flexible collaborative areas and private work spaces. Ambitious both in concept and in design, the building is striving to become one of the largest net-zero energy buildings in the United States.

The aim of Cornell Tech to create an urban center for interdisciplinary research and innovation is very much in line with our vision at Morphosis, where we are constantly developing new ways to achieve ever more sustainable buildings and to spark greater connections among the people who use our buildings. With the Bloomberg Center, we’ve pushed the boundaries of current energy efficiency practices and set a new standard for building development in New York City, said Morphosis founder and design director Thom Mayne.

The Bridge / Weiss/Manfredi. Image  Iwan Baan

The Bridge / Weiss/Manfredi. Image Iwan Baan

The Bridge / Weiss/Manfredi. Image  Iwan Baan

The Bridge / Weiss/Manfredi. Image Iwan Baan

Next door is the Weiss/Manfredi-designed hub known as The Bridge. A new type of building, The Bridge offers spaces for students to work alongside start-ups and leading companies on diverse technological and business projects. The building is highly open, with gathering areas on each level, including a a multilevel Tech Gallery and a solar trellis-shaded rooftop terrace.

The building is a crystalline social condenser, one that reveals expansive skyline views and creates spaces for academics and entrepreneurs to slow down, talk to one another, and generate ideas in unprecedented ways, said Marion Weiss and Michael A. Manfredi, co-founders of WEISS/MANFREDI.

The Bridge / Weiss/Manfredi. Image  Iwan Baan

The Bridge / Weiss/Manfredi. Image Iwan Baan

The House / Handel Architects. Image  Field Condition

The House / Handel Architects. Image Field Condition

The final building to open is The House, the tallest and largest residential Passive House building in the world. Designed by Handel Architects, the building meets the strict Passive House standards for construction to reduce energy use and create a healthier and more comfortable living environment for a fraction of residents’ usual energy costs. The building will be occupied by both students and Cornell faculty, creating a year-round campus community.

The House is a groundbreaking example of sustainable architecture — the largest and tallest Passive House building in the world. It’s our answer to the call for change to combat global warming, said Gary Handel, President of Handel Architects.

The House / Handel Archtiects. Image  Iwan Baan

The House / Handel Archtiects. Image Iwan Baan

Cornell Tech Campus. Image  Iwan Baan

Cornell Tech Campus. Image Iwan Baan

The campus’ open spaces have also been designed with community-building and environmental sustainability in mind, with landscapes designed by James Corner Field Operations. Occupying the entire width of Roosevelt Island, the campus offers extraordinary views of the Manhattan and Queens skylines. A central pedestrian spine known as the Tech Walk connects the buildings of Phase 1 with future phases, while green spaces have been designed to rainwater harvsting and stormwater management.

With Cornell Tech‘s new campus, we have been able to integrate technology, sustainability, and landscape architecture to create a unique urban campus, said Karen Tamir, James Corner Field Operations‘ Principal-in-Charge. Each of the open spaces work together to provide settings for students, faculty, staff and visitors to sit, talk and collaborate, creating a lively, welcoming, and social environment.

Learn more about the Cornell Tech campus, here.

The Bloomberg Center / Morphosis. Image  Matthew Carbone for Morphosis

The Bloomberg Center / Morphosis. Image Matthew Carbone for Morphosis

Peka Peka House I / Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects

 Jason Mann

Jason Mann

 Jason Mann

Jason Mann

From the architect. On top of a hill above Peka Peka Beach sit three simple boxes with expansive views across to Kapiti Island and inland towards pine forest plantation and agricultural farmland. There are two black-stained cedar boxes positioned to create a sheltered courtyard: one box is dedicated to living functions, the other to sleeping. The third box, clad in profiled polycarbonate, contains the garage and workshop: at night it glows when lit from within. Combined, they form a compact house designed as a primary residence for the owners.

 Jason Mann

Jason Mann

The design is a response to both views and climate; the latter a particularly important consideration for year-round living in such an exposed location. The North-facing courtyard is protected from coastal winds, yet still enjoys views right through the living room towards the sea. Timber decking surrounds the house and provides a variety of scenarios to seek shelter depending on the prevailing weather conditions.

 Jason Mann

Jason Mann

As requested by our knowledgeable clients, the house promotes some eco values in the form of a combination of PV and solar hot water panels and above code insulation. Their long-term ambition is to go off-grid. LED lighting throughout and exposed and insulated concrete slab as a heat store helps reduce power consumption. Natural ventilation picks up the consistent afternoon sea breezes.

 Jason Mann

Jason Mann

Floor Plan

Floor Plan

 Jason Mann

Jason Mann

Emerald Hills Leisure Centre / MJMA + MTa

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

  • Architects: MJMA, MTa
  • Location: Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada
  • Mjma Team: Ted Watson, Vitkors Jaunkalns, Andrew Filarski, Robert Allen, David Miller, Cathy McMahon, Tarisha Dolyniuk, Andrew Bramm, Jason Wah, Kenyon Jin, Katya Tunon-Marshall, Timothy Belanger, Amanda Chong
  • M Ta Team: Tom Tittemore, Bill Vance
  • Area: 57000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Shai Gil
  • Structural: Read Jones Christoffersen Ltd.
  • Mechanical: Smith + Andersen
  • Electrical: Smith + Andersen
  • Civil: ISL Engineers

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

From the architect. The Emerald Hills Leisure Centre caters specifically to leisure, therapeutic, and learn-to-swim programming. The facility is co-joined to an existing Catholic High School with an operating partnership to create a shared ‘Community Centre’ as well as aquatic programming for students.

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

The aquatic hall and lobby are conceived of as a singular sculpted volume that defines the new social hub of the community. The existing gymnasium, auditorium, and classrooms are shared with the aquatic facility to create a vibrant evening community center for the greater community. The County maximizes utilization of both the pool and the school with joint use agreements with opportunities to connect for rehabilitation and therapy, given the proximity to a new hospital complex.

Ground Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

The aquatic center includes a 6-lane 25-metre lap pool, adjustable floor therapy pool, tot pool, whirl pool, and steam room. The facility features a fully transparent gender-neutral universal change room accessible and inclusive for all. An upper level ‘shell space’ is provided above the change rooms as a future fitness center.

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

Formally the building is a simple and affordable ‘big box’ volume designed to have a sense of lightness and dynamic movement. The building’s trapezoidal plan is created by maximizing the buildable footprint to the site setbacks. The mono-slope roof drains diagonally to provide maximum natatorium volume, and clerestory daylighting with a low height to the rear courtyard.

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

White triangulated standing seam panels float above a black pre cast base and incorporate four triangulated glazing locations. Interior acoustic surfaces and ceiling are triangulated above a black hexagonally tiled base to create a serene, unified and high-quality sonic environment.

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

Responding to the Northern Alberta climate the building’s triple glazed openings are minimized to four strategic locations and shaped to maximize their effect. The amount of glazing is specifically located low at deck level for views to landscaped areas to the west and located high on the front elevation to bounce light off the ceiling structure – resulting in maximum low-glare lighting distribution.

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

A key building feature is the filtration system – a salt-water German Wapotec system that has a lower than normal chlorine requirement. The HydroSan flocculant filtration process removes organics to achieve European DIN standards, providing the highest level of water clarity and air quality.

 Shai Gil

Shai Gil

World’s Largest Sandcastle Rises in Landlocked German City

<img title="Image by Instagram user velberlinle” src=”http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/59ad/9447/b22e/385f/6b00/0104/medium_jpg/21296436_351446025285735_2649084593507926016_n.jpg?1504547908&#8243; alt=”Image by Instagram user velberlinle“/>

Image by Instagram user velberlinle

The Guinness Book of World Records has crowned a new world champion sandcastle in a surprising location: the landlocked city of Duisburg, Germany.

Rising 55 feet (16.68 meters) into the sky, the sandscraper is formed from more than 3,860 tons of sand sculptured by a team of designers from 10 countries over a three week period. Stylized as a magnificent medieval city, the design also incorporates familiar structures from around the world, including an appropriately leaning scale version of the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

This was the second year in a row the city attempted to claim the title of world’s largest sandcastle. Last year, the structure suffered a significant collapse and was disqualified for using materials other than just sand and water. This year, the sculptors used a different variety of sand, composed largely of a very fine quartz measuring less than one millimeter per grain. The attempt hit a snag once again with a minor collapse mid-way through construction, but the designers were able to adapt their design on the fly to reach the final mark.

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The Duisburg castle takes over the title from a 50-foot-tall structure completed just this past February in Puri, India.

The sandcastle is planned to remain on view through September 29th.

News via Business Insider

Calvin Seibert Sculpts Impressive Modernist Sandcastles

“I always had an affinity for architecture which I attribute to growing up in a neighborhood and town that was constantly under construction. Our house was the first on the block. I think that in a way I was more interested in the abstractness of the foundations and the initial framing then in the completed structures themselves.

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Curators and Theme Announced for US Pavilion at 2017 Venice Biennale

Images by Project Projects, Daniele Resini SRGF, NY.

Images by Project Projects, Daniele Resini SRGF, NY.

The U.S. State Department has announced the individuals and institutions that will serve as curators and commissioners of the United States Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale.

Selecting through an open competition and recommendations from the Federal Advisory Committee on International Exhibitions, the exhibition will be led by co-commissioners The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) and the University of Chicago and curators Niall Atkinson, Associate Professor of Architectural History at the University of Chicago; Ann Lui, Assistant Professor at SAIC and co-founder of Chicago-based architecture practice Future Firm; and Mimi Zeiger, a critic, editor, curator, and educator based in Los Angeles.

Under the theme of Dimensions of Citizenship, the exhibition will explore the meaning of citizenship as a cluster of rights and responsibilities at the intersection of legal, political, economic, and societal affiliations.

Curators from left to right: Mimi Zeiger, Niall Atkinson, Ann Lui. Image by Nancy Wong

Curators from left to right: Mimi Zeiger, Niall Atkinson, Ann Lui. Image by Nancy Wong

It is urgent that architecture act as an important tool in understanding, shaping, and envisioning what it means to be a citizen today, said the curators in a statement released with the news announcement.

Our goal is to present the United States as a site of critical research and practice in architecture, at the intersection of old and new forms of community engagement, political action, and public policy. Globalization, digital technology, and geopolitical transformations are continuing to challenge conventional notions of citizenship across scales. This exhibition will present works by architects, designers, artists, and thinkers who are responding to today’s shifting modes of citizenship, and putting forth visions of future ways of belonging.

The individual exhibitors that will contribute to the U.S. Pavilion will be announced over the upcoming months. The pavilion will be on display at the 2018 Venice Biennale from May 26 to November 25, 2018.

House in Hoshigaoka / Shogo ARATANI Architect & Associates

 Shigeo Ogawa

Shigeo Ogawa

  • General Contractor: IFA Inc.
  • Structural System: Timber Flame
  • Consultant: S3 Associates Inc.

 Shigeo Ogawa

Shigeo Ogawa

From the architect. The site is located in North Eastern part of Osaka prefecture, where its surrounding neighborhood in mature residential quarter remains quiet, even though it is just a little away from the main road. While the site has a flat condition as it does not have any height difference, the surrounding residential area has ups and downs, and the site is in a sunken part of the area.

 Shigeo Ogawa

Shigeo Ogawa

This is a project to design a small house for three adult residents-an elderly couple and their grown up child. Since the site is large enough compared to the requested volume of the house, it was possible to provide a parking space on the north side, a garden space on the south side, and a space for a wide approach on the west side of the site.

 Shigeo Ogawa

Shigeo Ogawa

1st and 2nd-floor volumes are layered in slightly shifted positions against each other, and a square hipped roof is placed on top of those volumes as if like an umbrella. The gaps produced by the shifted volumes are turned into elements such as an open ceiling space or a high side lighting-therefore the layering of the lower floor and upper floor volumes was carefully coordinated to define and adjust the dimensions of those elements. Finally, the depth of the eaves was defined in order to maximize the intake of daylight from the high side lighting.

Sections

Sections

The 1st-floor plan is set as a family gathering space and a space for the parents, while the 2nd floor is the space for the single child-thus each style of living is separately defined between the upper level and the lower level. However, each floor is connected through the open ceiling space so that each family member can feel the presence of others. It is also for the consideration of the possible case in the future for nursing the parents.

 Shigeo Ogawa

Shigeo Ogawa

On the 1st floor, the family gathering space, a large earthen floor leading to the outside is provided for their dog, which forms a continuous space to the garden. This wide earthen floor is also considering the possibility in the future to be used as an approach for a wheelchair; thus the entrance door is provided as a large-sized swing door to be opened widely to the outside.

Floors Plans

Floors Plans

On the 2nd floor level, the shape of the square hipped roof with a slope of 30 is reflected the interior space. The space has a calm atmosphere, to be enveloped by the undulating ceiling in varying heights, with the daylight from the two top lights on the ceiling.

 Shigeo Ogawa

Shigeo Ogawa

Such lighting condition is provided not only for those main living spaces, but also for the kitchen area, the water section with bathroom, and even for the storeroom. Various lighting conditions will promote changes and differences in those spaces, and that will enrich the living of the residents in this house.