BuzziJungle / BuzziSpace

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

  • Architects: BuzziSpace
  • Location: Kontich, Belgium
  • Area: 10.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

From the architect. Inspired by nature, BuzziJungle offers a solution to the conventional meetingspace. The launch of the BuzziJungle will introduce the design world to youngBelgian talent Jonas Van Put. This is Van Put’s first project with a majorinternational manufacturer.BuzziJungle is BuzziSpace’s reflection of theirvision for the social office and further pushing the traditional boundaries ofthe workplace.

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

Elevation

Elevation

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

Elevation

Elevation

Various elements within thestructure provide an opportunity for different interactions within thejungle. You can climb, lounge and meet in the elevated work-lounge space madefrom lacquered steel. The BuzziJungle creates an urban footprint in large andsmall spaces.

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

Courtesy of BuzziJungle

URV University Campus / Josep Ferrando + Pere Joan Ravetllat + Carme Ribas

 Pedro Pegenaute

Pedro Pegenaute

  • Construction: Construccions PAI, S.A.
  • Technical Architect: Toledo-Villarreal + Valeri Consultors
  • Structural Engineer: NB-35 Barcelona
  • Colaborators: Marc Nadal + Ferran Laguna + Roman Ortega + Olga Schmid + Aida Espanyol + Tania Oramas
  • Budget: 9.800.000
  • Client: Universitat Rovira I Virgili

 Pedro Pegenaute

Pedro Pegenaute

Situation

The new building of the “Terres del l’Ebre” Campus is located in the area of the Tortosa Fairground, to the north of the city, situated between the Ebro river and the district of Remolins

Implantation

Implantation

Location

The location is especially attractive because of its complexity. It is a representative and clearly identifiable ground as an urban framework. Halfway between the park and the city, the proposal aims to smooth the transition between the natural and urban surroundings. On the one hand, we can discover the new building in the middle of the trees, as a fragmented and discontinuous piece to allow easy integration with the surroundings of the park. From the other side, on the contrary, it is able to offer a more compact urban facade that overlies the urban topography assuming the usual height of the city.

Mock-Up

Mock-Up

Its settlement platform is at an upper limit of the park due to the risk of flooding. The difference of dimensions between the park and the building is solved through a series of ramps that give continuity to the space of the park.

 Pedro Pegenaute

Pedro Pegenaute

The Building

In plan, the building moves away from the street to obtain the necessary perimeter for the layout of the program and at the same time can be easily traversed. Contrarily, what would represent a barrier-building, the layout facilitates the diagonal routes and allows to relate the park wiith the avenue that connects the city and the fairground. The new campus wants to be the door of the park creating a beginning and an end and, ate the sime time, be the antechamber of the mentioned avenue. This duality of location characterizes its implantation.

Floor Plan

Floor Plan

The program

The plan form allows you to set a good layout of the requested program. External galleries are established grouping by thematic areas, reducing the interior circulation, minimizing the corridors and generating squares or small relation spaces. Between these common spaces and those of specific uses located in the facade these is an element of variable thickness that serves as transition and filter. Contains support spaces such as bathrooms, facilities patios, box office, etc… promoting acoustic absorption.

 Pedro Pegenaute

Pedro Pegenaute

The section aims to bring natural light to the center of the building in those strategic spaces as the end of the circulation spaces. In addition, it allows to locate the most public or open program on the ground floor where the hall is located with the exhibition space, the library connected with the computer spaces, the study room and the bar. In the first floor there are three types of classroom that houses the teaching needs, while in the second floor are located the teacher’s room. Finally, the third floor houses the management room along with the university extension spaces.

Axonometrics

Axonometrics

The Structure

The project comtemplates the construction of a building that presents the shape of a star when seen in the floor plan, with a central body practically square, where the dilatation joint is located. Around the central body are arranged five aisle with independent structures.

 Pedro Pegenaute

Pedro Pegenaute

In the perimetal zones a unidirectional lining solution was planned with post-tensioned ribs supported on flat beams.

Planta en Vista Ojo de Pez

Planta en Vista Ojo de Pez

In the central zone, basically destined the distribution and vertical communication between common areas, lights are positioned between the pillars of 9,60m in two directions. Through this illumination, a reticular lining was planned.

 Pedro Pegenaute

Pedro Pegenaute

The Surroundings

Outwardly it was through a modular concrete coating that guarantees the continuity of the facade. The two types of pieces with dimensions 1.20 x 4.20m are differentiated: an opaque panel and a trellised panel that sifts the light. According to the needs of the interior spaces we can find the opaque piece, the piece of trellis or neither, so that we can discover the different views regarding the park and the city.

Section Details

Section Details

In the area of the ground access porch, a coating is placed on the ceramic seal of galvanized steel plates, on support system also made with galvanized steel profiles.

 Pedro Pegenaute

Pedro Pegenaute

251 1st Street / ODA New York

 Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

  • Architects: ODA New York
  • Location: 251 1st St, Brooklyn, NY 11215, United States
  • Lead Architects: Eran Chen, P. Christian Bailey, Ryoko Okada, Dongyoung Kim, Hadas Brayer, Vi Nguyen, Asuncion Tapia
  • Area: 80000.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal
  • Video: Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal
  • Renderings: Heroes Visuals
  • Plans/Gi Fs: ODA New York
  • Client: Adam America Real Estate

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From the architect. Situated at the corner of 4th Avenue and 1st Street in the coveted Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, 251 1st by ODA New York is the firm’s latest manifestation of its steadfast commitment to improving quality of life in urban areas. In this case-taking a page from its well-documented playbook-ODA’s inflected the building’s upper massing with a cascade of setbacks and terraces, yielding substantial outdoor space, as well as multiple exposures for units.

 Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

In addition to light and outdoor area, playing with the massing in this way also provides a sensitive contextual nod: A more formal, closed exterior on bustling 4th Avenue-suitable for the major commercial artery-gives way to the porous push and pull of the terracing along 1st Street, design language meant to mimic the small scale of area brownstones and to engage with 1st’s intimate, more residential quality.

In this interaction between disparate exterior elements, 251 1st also references an abstract undercurrent-the generational and cultural shift, as Brooklyn, a once sleepy, largely residential outer borough, continues its transformation into one of NYC’s great cultural epicenters. In other words, both legs of Brooklyn‘s changing identity receive expression on the exterior of 251 1st.

Render  Heroes Visuals

Render Heroes Visuals

 Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Inside, ODA’s design is conceived as a kind of urban oasis. While the clean lines and unabashed geometry of the contemporary canon are prominent on the exterior, the lobby-open planned, full-floored and attended 24 hours (via doorman and virtual concierge)-has a softer, distinctly natural, almost zen-like aura, with a strong emphasis on materials: a rich medley of woods, concrete, and metals. In the lobby’s lounge areas, living green wall receive ample light through transparent front and rear glass.

Render  Heroes Visuals

Render Heroes Visuals

Units, in contrast, feature muted palettes-and are, per usual, elegantly appointed. Wide plank white oaks floors lay beneath soaring ceilings, circumscribed by floor-to- ceiling glass windows and doors. Powder rooms, secondary baths, and master baths are outfitted with Italian marble, imported porcelain, and white honed marble, respectively. And eleven light-filled penthouses boast panoramic vistas reaching from the Manhattan skyline to the Verrezano-Narrows Bridge.

 Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

 Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

And, as ODA residents have come to expect, the building features a generous slew of amenities, from the familiar-two sun-soaked courtyards, a landscaped terrace-to the luxuriantly unexpected: an entry floor library, stroller valet, fitness/yoga room, and even a pet grooming station, among others.

 Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Miguel de Guzman / Imagen Subliminal

Spotlight: John Hejduk

Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image  Liao Yusheng

Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image Liao Yusheng

Artist, architect and architectural theoristJohn Hejduk (19 July 1929 – 3 July 2000) introduced new ways of thinking about space that are still highly influential in bothmodernist andpost-modernist architecture today, especially among the large numberof architects who were once his students. Inspired both by darker, gothic themes and modernist thinking on the human psyche, his relatively small collection of built work, and many of his unbuilt plans and drawings, have gone on to inspireother projects and architects around the world. In addition, his drawing, writing and teaching have gone on to shape the meeting of modernist and postmodern influences in contemporary architecture and helped bring psychological approaches to the forefront of design.

<img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/55a6/638d/e58e/ce0f/5400/0002/medium_jpg/HejdukPrague1991.jpg?1436967818" alt="Image via Wikimedia user Gamje (public domain)” title=”Image via Wikimedia user Gamje (public domain)” />

Image via Wikimedia user Gamje (public domain)

Born inNew York toCzech parents, Hejduk graduated from the University ofCincinnati in 1952 and rapidly added a Master’s degree fromHarvard a year later. Unlike most prominent architects, who would attempt to join a practice or apprentice under a contemporary master, Hejduk jumped right back into university, but this time as a teacher at the University of Texas – where his unusual teaching style had him join the “The Texas Rangers,” a group of young architects who created an innovative school curriculum. After the entire group was fired, Hejduk briefly worked underI M Pei in New York and taughtat Cornell,beforeeventually settling at Cooper Union, where he became aprofessor in 1964.

<img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/55a6/64df/e58e/ce0f/5400/0007/medium_jpg/2013._Torres_Hejduk._Cidade_da_Cultura._Santiago_de_Compostela_-_Galiza-2.jpg?1436968138" alt="John Hejduk Towers in Galicia, built by Eisenman to Hedjuk's plans from 1992. Image Wikimedia user Luis Miguel Bugallo Snchez (Lmbuga) licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0” title=”John Hejduk Towers in Galicia, built by Eisenman to Hedjuk’s plans from 1992. Image Wikimedia user Luis Miguel Bugallo Snchez (Lmbuga) licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0” />

John Hejduk Towers in Galicia, built by Eisenman to Hedjuk’s plans from 1992. Image Wikimedia user Luis Miguel Bugallo Snchez (Lmbuga) licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

After many years of hopping around, working at Cooper gave Hejduk the stability and position he needed to make waves. Winning a research grant in 1967, he began exploring his early, radical curriculum of exercises involving creating space using geometric shapes placed in various square, diagonal and curving grids in more rigorous detail, but he soon moved away to a more “free hand” approach. He began exploring new influences: psychology, mythology and later in his career, religion.

<img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/55a6/6393/e58e/ce12/db00/0001/medium_jpg/800px-Cooper_Union_by_David_Shankbone_crop.jpg?1436967824" alt="The Foundation Building of the Cooper Union, which underwent a major renovation by Hejduk in 1975. Image Wikimedia user DavidShankbone licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0” title=”The Foundation Building of the Cooper Union, which underwent a major renovation by Hejduk in 1975. Image Wikimedia user DavidShankbone licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0” />

The Foundation Building of the Cooper Union, which underwent a major renovation by Hejduk in 1975. Image Wikimedia user DavidShankbone licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Publishing his first book in 1969, he embarked upon a career as an artist and theorist, teaching that elements were loaded with emotional context. His drawings often considered themes of architecture through a rather dark lens, and his most famous, the New England Masque (1981) charted alienation within a marriage and was inspired, of all things, by the film version of Stephen King’s “The Shining.”

<img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/55a6/6379/e58e/ce0f/5400/0001/medium_jpg/800px-Wall_House2.jpg?1436967798" alt="Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image Wikimedia user Wenkbrauwalbatros licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0” title=”Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image Wikimedia user Wenkbrauwalbatros licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0” />

Wall House II, built 2001 in the Netherlands. Image Wikimedia user Wenkbrauwalbatros licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

That’s not to say Hejduk wasn’t a practical architect as well as a theoretical one. Many of his drawings were detailed, buildable architectural plans, such as Wall House I, where he used a single wall to divide the space in hopes of investing it with emotions of division. He built several projects in Berlin, including Cooper Union’s Foundation Building (1975) which he reconstructed, Wall House II, which was built posthumously in the Netherlands, and the famous Kreuzberg Tower, built in 1987 and designed as part of a competition to provide new forms of low and middle income housing in West Berlin. A quietly regimented design, it stands out against the other more post-modern designs of the competition with its reduced color palette and focus on shape.

<img src="http://images.adsttc.com/media/images/55a6/63bb/e58e/ce12/db00/0002/medium_jpg/stringdio.jpg?1436967865" alt="The Kreuzberg Tower. Image Flickr user seier licensed under CC BY 2.0” title=”The Kreuzberg Tower. Image Flickr user seier licensed under CC BY 2.0” />

The Kreuzberg Tower. Image Flickr user seier licensed under CC BY 2.0

See all of John Hejduk’s work featured on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below, and further coverage below those. You can also see a gallery of his paper workhere.

“Too Radical to Implement Yet Too Relevant to Ignore”: John Hejduk’s Kreuzberg Tower

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John Hejduk’s Jan Palach Memorial Opens in Prague//cdn.embedly.com/widgets/platform.js

SO-IL + laisne roussel Win Competition for Innovative Riverfront Development in Paris

Aerial view from the Pont d'Austerlitz. In the foreground, the housing building and temporary pavilion. Image  SO  IL and laisne roussel (Weiss Images)

Aerial view from the Pont d’Austerlitz. In the foreground, the housing building and temporary pavilion. Image SO IL and laisne roussel (Weiss Images)

SO-IL and Laisn Roussel architects have been selected as the winners of an international competition to design a new masterplan for Place Mazas in Paris. Titled L’Atelier de l’Arsenal, the proposal seeks to integrate the historic fabric of the site into a new, flexible urban strategy organized around a variety of new buildings and public spaces.

View from the Arsenal Basin. In the foreground, the public plaza overlooking the swimming pool. Image  SO  IL and laisne roussel (Weiss Images)

View from the Arsenal Basin. In the foreground, the public plaza overlooking the swimming pool. Image SO IL and laisne roussel (Weiss Images)

Located along the Seine River and the Canal Saint Martin at the end of the Bastille Axis, the area is currently in the midst of several civic development projects, including the upcoming waterfront park, parc Rives de Seine. SO-IL and Laisn Roussel‘s proposal will add mixed-use program to the mix, all of which will feature views of the river and the Parisian cityscape.

We are very excited to work on such a unique site in Paris, said Ilias Papageorgiou, Partner, SO-IL. Our proposal suggests a dynamic approach in city making, one that considers history as well as the complexity of today’s conditions while allowing room to accommodate future transformation.

Axonometric view from the Arsenal Basin. Image  SO  IL and laisne roussel

Axonometric view from the Arsenal Basin. Image SO IL and laisne roussel

The masterplan divides the site into two main parts. The first, a seven-story wood structure, is located along the historical Haussmanian axis and offers co-living units, social housing and a restaurant. The other side of the site is dedicated to public activities, including a publicly-accessible pavilion containing co-working spaces, a fabrication lab, and a multi-purpose room; a repurpose lockhouse built in 1905 repurposed for cultural events; and three new public squares. An existing homeless facility on site, Aurore, will also be incorporated into the plan.

The design also seeks to activate the waterfront space, providing space for the Yacht Club of Bastille as well as a public swimming pool and several pools for biodiversity research and water quality monitoring.

The design of the Atelier de L’Arsenal is motivated by our conviction that architecture is everyone’s business. In our view, urban resilience and the collective practices developed for and by users are two major challenges for the cities of tomorrow. Nicolas Laisne and Dimitri Roussel, Partners, laisne roussel.

View of the subway plaza from the Quai de la Rapee. On the left, the residential building, on the right, the temporary pavilion. Image  SO  IL and laisne roussel (Weiss Images)

View of the subway plaza from the Quai de la Rapee. On the left, the residential building, on the right, the temporary pavilion. Image SO IL and laisne roussel (Weiss Images)

The competition was organized by the city of Paris as part of the Reinventer La Seine initiative, which aims to introduce innovative new proposals at the intersection of architecture, creative urbanism, and development for sites along the river.

News via SO-IL

  • Architects: SO-IL, laisn roussel
  • Location: Voie Mazas, Paris, France
  • Client: REI Habitat, Icade Promotion
  • Team: Atelier Georges, Manifesto, Of ce for Cities, WoMa, Yacht Club Paris Bastille, Aurore, Colonies, Institut du Monde Arabe, Base Tara, Cluster EMS, Innogur, Elioth, Acousteb, Sinteo, Maitre Cube, Francilibois
  • Lead Developer: REI Habitat
  • Developer: ICADE
  • Landscape Architect/Urban Planner: Atelier Georges
  • Area: 0.0 ft2

House in the Outskirts of Brussels / SAMYN and PARTNERS

 Marie-Franoise Plissart

Marie-Franoise Plissart

  • Associates: Gh. Andr, S. Bessalah, B. Darras, Ph. Gaube, I. Hankart, P. Hendrix, Th. Henrard, A.S. Petit
  • Structural Engineering: SAMYN and PARTNERS sprl
  • Building Services: SAMYN and PARTNERS sprl, (in collaboration with FTI sa) Ph. Samyn, J . Michiels
  • Civil Works: RECUBO
  • Construction Coordinator: JC Consulting
  • Cost Control: FORUM
  • Management: A. Charon
  • Model: A.M.A., F. Van Hoye
  • Botanical Artist: Patrick Blanc
  • Carpentry: POTTEAU-Labo
  • Glass Roofs: L’ATELIER DU VERRE
  • Watertightness: MEULEMAN J-P
  • Automatic Watering: AUTOMATIC SPRAYING SYSTEMS
  • Installation Of Vegetal Wall: John Jacob sprl

 Marie-Franoise Plissart

Marie-Franoise Plissart

From the architect. This house for an artist includes the street level of an existing small house. It now houses the entry hall, a family room and a kitchen; the living-room and the stairway are in the extension to the building.

 Marie-Franoise Plissart

Marie-Franoise Plissart

Longitudinal Section

Longitudinal Section

 Marie-Franoise Plissart

Marie-Franoise Plissart

The second floor includes the master bedroom with its bathroom, as well as ve children’s rooms and sanitary installations. They are equipped with a mezzanine protected by textile netting that will lead to the glassed-wall facade.

Cross Section

Cross Section

The house presents curved and vegetalised facades that are very private and closed to the neighbours to the north, the east and the south. In contrast, the west facade is entirely glass-walled as if it were one huge partitioned window.

 Vincent Everarts

Vincent Everarts

It is planned that Immense translucid white polyester curtains in widths of 1.6 m suspended from the top of the structure to the ground floor would run along this great window to ensure shade in the summer months.

 Marie-Franoise Plissart

Marie-Franoise Plissart

Initially conceived as a wall of ivy with a patinated cop- per roof, the vegetalised facade is finally composed of a selection of exotic plants chosen by the botanical artist Patrick Blanc, and extends to cover the roof.

 Andres Fernandez Marcos

Andres Fernandez Marcos

We had to design the structure, the insulation, and the water-tightness of the envelope and resolve the building physics issues in order to receive the necessary support systems, irrigation and fertilisation systems for the plants that are set into a felt support stapled to rigid PVC panels.

How To Use Neutral Colors In Interior Design: 2 Examples That Show The Easy, Minimalist Way

Anyone with an interest in design knows that there are an infinite number of ways to decorate the same space. Whereas one family might prefer bright color, soft textures, and lots of indoor plants a young couple may tend towards minimalism and cool, neutral colors. The two homes featured in this post are both in the latter camp. By using largely neutral colors like gray, brown, white, and beige the designs cultivate serenity. There is nothing more soothing than moving from room to room and knowing that each space will be a cool, clean, simple space. Just look below to find out how relaxing these kinds of designs can be.

Visualizer: Igor Sirotov

The first home is a simple design that includes very few frills or unnecessary pieces.

Beginning in the living room, the space is largely dominated by a soft but simple gray sectional sofa, set against ercu walls.

In a simple design, unique coffee tables like this reclaimed wood design can act as focal points.

Mounting the television under the counter is a unique way to save space and keep those walls bare.

A creative fireplace provides a bit of warmth to the cool space, both figuratively and literally.

The open floor plan mean that unique wine glasses set on the table become a decorative choice.

A frosted interior window lets a little bit of light into the dark grey kitchen.

Grey kitchens offer a modern look that woks well with many types of kitchen appliances and accessories (whether or not you choose to use them).

For instance, a simple glass pitcher in a gray kitchen takes on a life of its own.

Moving into the bedroom, unique floor lamps offer a bit of character to a sparse design.

A white platform bed is a simple centerpiece and all but blends with the walls.

A small desk area continues the white theme – desk chair, desk, even mugs.

White and wood together, with a side table and the floor, are a match made in minimalist heaven.

Visualizer: Kyde Architects

The second home is called House on the hill and is located in Cuxhaven, Germany.

The team at Kyde Architects designed the house for a young man who is the director of an IT company.

The 160 square meter (1722 square feet) home features a large gray modular sofa in the main living area.

The sofa can easily be reconfigured to sit people in different arrangements, making it both stylish and practical.

In addition to the sofa, the main open living area features a modern fireplace.

The inclusion of the fireplace also acts as a room divider for different spaces.

Molded leather seating offers another masculine, modern seating option.

The gray and black dining room design includes dining room pendants as well as modern dining chairs.

Carefully chosen accessories like unique teapots can make a big difference in a minimalist design.

Lots of natural light is imperative if you are going to decorate with so many dark colors.

To take the clean lines to the next level, the kitchen features are largely hidden. Dark gray walls slide open to reveal the sink and countertop while the oven stays exposed. The result of this unique design is kitchen clutter than can be completely hidden from view whenever the homeowner likes.

Even such beautiful kitchenwares as natural wood cutting boards can look messy when left out. But not in this kitchen.

Kitchen bar stools are placed in an elevated nook for a beautiful dining experience.

The bedroom does feel like it was built for a man with little warmth or unnecessary elements.

A low-to-the-ground bed with a spacious en suite and lots of gray does not exactly scream cozy.

Lots of closet space is always a nice feature – here it must stay organized or it could quickly become a design disaster.

Large mirrors leaned up against the wall are an elegant solution that again keeps walls uncluttered.

The spacious bathroom includes a tub with a view, which is the height of luxury.

A burnished container adds a bit of sparkle to the largely matte design.

Cool gray walls in the bathroom are made a bit more interesting with texture.

Even the garage has the sleek, modern, minimal feel.

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