Selenium Atakoy / DILEKCI Architects

© Thomas Mayer

© Thomas Mayer

  • Architects: DILEKCI Architects
  • Location: Ataköy 7-8-9-10 Mahallesi,, 34158 Bakırköy/İstanbul, Turkey
  • Architects In Charge: Durmuş Dilekci, Emir Uras
  • Team: Handan Akbudak, Kayıhan Akipek, Fikret Sungay, Evren alpay, Ayber Gülfer
  • Area: 60000.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Thomas Mayer
  • Developer: Aşçıoğlu İnşaat
  • Structural Design: Boztepe Engineering
  • Electrical Design: Aykar Engineering
  • Mechanical Design: Tanrıöver Consulting

© Thomas Mayer

© Thomas Mayer

Text description provided by the architects. During the design process, we especially started the process thinking about the connection with the surrounding environment.   In order to maintain an equivalent connection in every direction with the project site being surrounded by crossroads, the E-5 motorway and connective roads have led us to work on a fluid geometry. By removing the corners fluid form enables a transitive connection both with the other structures and surrounding roads. Based on fluidity and transitive principles, elliptical geometry brings significant added value to high-density development schemes. It softens the relations in-between masses and the living units gain variable and different dynamic perspectives. In this project, we aimed for a new planning strategy in order to re-interpret the accustomed planning layout, especially in development projects.

Site Plan

Site Plan

Instead of creating a circular form, with every angle analyzed one by one an ideal elliptical geometry is formed. The shifts between floors enable the architecture to create a fluid silhouette within its environment. Selenium Atakoy is a high-density residence complex project. What we aimed for here is creating a living space formed out of a different language, unlike the usual common housing and residential projects. The project includes sports and spa areas, playgrounds for children, meeting and commercial areas which brings this concept of a living space brand new perspectives. High rise blocks in the project are formed of units with different areas. The high amount of small units architecturally requires a geometry which extends the facade. Because of this, we used the elliptical form in order to create a construct which includes different angles of vista.

© Thomas Mayer

© Thomas Mayer

The elliptical form creates larger facades unintentionally because of the way of its form works. This way the smaller units gain approximately 9.00-10.00 meters square wide facades which turns back as more light, wider vistas and a sense of a larger space. Also, the elliptical plan helps to gather the wet spaces such as bathrooms and kitchens which don’t need as much light at the back and near the core. Furthermore in Selenium Atakoy emptying the cores of the blocks allow for closed corridors to disappear and for the single facade units benefit from climatization by the central atrium void. The air-flow enters from the ground floor and moves along the atrium through all floors until it reaches the roof.

© Thomas Mayer

© Thomas Mayer

First Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

© Thomas Mayer

© Thomas Mayer

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Muay Thai Space / BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

  • Architects: Bao Wei Architecture Office
  • Location: Wangjing SOHO, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China
  • Lead Architect: Wei Bao
  • Architectural Design: Yan Jia
  • Area: 210.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Lighting Design: Xin Zhang, Xiaowei Han, Xuanyu Zhou, Bentian Niu (Zhang Xin Studio, Tsinghua University Architecture Collegue)
  • Electrical Engineering: Yunfeng Hang
  • Client: Genuine Warriors Sports

Courtesy of BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

Text description provided by the architects. Wangjing SOHO serves as the landmark of Wangjing urban space with its predominant architectural presence. The site presented itself as a challenge as how to respond to the city with its three open edges.

Courtesy of BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

As an anchoring tenant, its three sides are a continuous curve, with only one straight edge. There are seven columns that lean into the space with various degrees.

Exploded Axonometric

Exploded Axonometric

The space will be used as a Muay Thai place. The fighting ring is the central program. The ring is 5m in square, with a height of 800mm, or even 2m if counting the railings. It’s highly visible with its elevated massing in the open space. On the other hand, programs such as shower and changing happen in an enclosed space.

Courtesy of BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

A linear volume is applied to the west edge. It condenses foyer, bar, and shower and changing area into one space and leaves the rest to the open area, maximizing the spatial potential. The ring is placed within the space that is surrounded by the four slanted columns, forming the visual focus of the entire space. This is consistent with the plan of a theater: the shrinking end of a fanning plan is used for the stage while the open area is for the audience. The ring becomes the stage.

Courtesy of BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

How to resolve all the issues mentioned about within a structural synthesis is in the final analysis. An arch system is applied to all the bays between the columns on the south, north and east sides. Along the east-west axis, a series of arches are also created between the columns. These nine arch controlling lines form the very basis of structural genesis.

Ceiling Structure

Ceiling Structure

To loft between the pairs of arches, a series of surfaces are produced. All these surfaces are joined into one continuous canopy after trimming. The arch shapes are controlled by adjustable conic curves, achieving spatial efficiency while remaining its continuity.

Courtesy of BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

The continuous canopy is split at the height of 2m. The upper part is partitioned along the east-west axis, forming the ceiling components. The lower parts are contoured vertically, forming the pillars that support the ceiling. This not only differentiate the two conceptually, but also functionally: the pillars need to be solid as to interact with people directly, while the ceiling needs to be open as to accommodate all service conduits. All these components are digitally cut by with 18mm thick density boards. The seams of these component panels are arranged in a fashion that achieves both spatial effect and material efficiency. The lighting above the ceiling are arrayed and lit upward so that the diffuse light from the ceiling can penetrate the panels, creating a soft ambient light environment that one can totally immerse within.

Concept Diagram

Concept Diagram

The four pillars within the open space concentrate on plan, the arches contract in section, and the ring is staged on a platform. All these add to the effect of total enclosure for anyone on the ring. The program areas on the open plan are defined by varying ceiling heights: high at the apex of the arch in the center for training area, and low at the edges for miscellaneous training areas.

The arches also respond to the unban challenge set above: bringing Muay Thai, a highly competitive sport back to the colosseum symbolically.

Courtesy of BWAO

Courtesy of BWAO

Guangming Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Project Wins World Building of the Year 2017

Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Project in Guangming Village / The Chinese University of Hong Kong & Kunming University of Science and Technology. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Project in Guangming Village / The Chinese University of Hong Kong & Kunming University of Science and Technology. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

The Chinese University of Hong Kong & Kunming University of Science and Technology‘s Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Project in Guangming Village has been named the World Building of the Year for 2017 at the finale gala of the World Architecture Festival (WAF) in Berlin.

The project becomes the 10th to hold the title of World Building of the Year. Last year, the award was given to Robert Konieczny + KWK Promes’ National Museum in Szczecin – Dialogue Centre Przełomy.

Due to the “high standard of category winners presented in the first two days of WAF”, the super jury has also awarded a Director’s Special Award to Superlofts Houthaven in Amsterdam by Marc Koehler Architects.

Winners of the year’s Future Project, Landscape, Small Project, Iran Special Prize and Best Use of Colour awards were also announced. Continue after the break to see the winners.

World Building of the Year:

Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Project in Guangming Village / The Chinese University of Hong Kong & Kunming University of Science and Technology

Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Project in Guangming Village / The Chinese University of Hong Kong & Kunming University of Science and Technology. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Project in Guangming Village / The Chinese University of Hong Kong & Kunming University of Science and Technology. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

The project was initiated in response to the catastrophic Ludian earthquake in 2014, which destroyed most of the traditional rammed-earth buildings in the village of Guangming. When replacement materials such as brick and concrete proved to be too costly for most of the village’s residents, the architect team developed a new technique of constructing rammed-earth homes that will be more resistant to future seismic activity.

A prototype house built for an elderly couple was completed last year, proving the method could provide a safe, economical, comfortable, and sustainable reconstruction strategy for the village and the wider region of Southwest China.

From the WAF:

The judges believed this to be an extraordinary project in terms of the scope of ambition, exemplified in the addressing of profound problems facing ordinary people. They applauded the re-use of traditional material and construction methods but with the addition of new technology – combining ancient wisdom with modern know-how.

The judges were also impressed by the iterative research process which could be re-applied to anywhere in the world affected by seismic problems and low levels of wealth. “The architects succeeded in translating ‘four walls and a roof’ into something which, through architectural commitment, becomes a project that is much more profound,” WAF Programme Director Paul Finch commented. “This building is a demonstration that architecture is just as relevant in the poorest of communities as it is in the richest.”

Director’s Special Award:

Superlofts Houthaven; Amsterdam, Netherlands / Marc Koehler Architects

Superlofts Houthaven; Amsterdam, Netherlands / Marc Koehler Architects. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

Superlofts Houthaven; Amsterdam, Netherlands / Marc Koehler Architects. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

A new co-housing concept that aims to create a global network of local building co-operatives, judges said the concept is “a game changer – a replicable and transferable model which could extend in terms of scale.”

Future Project of the Year:

Sydney Fish Markets; Sydney, Australia / Allen Jack + Cottier Architects    

Sydney Fish Markets; Sydney, Australia / Allen Jack + Cottier Architects . Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

Sydney Fish Markets; Sydney, Australia / Allen Jack + Cottier Architects . Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

WAF’s Future Project super jury selected the project for “the great transformation it offers to the area” commending it for its vision beyond the brief.” Its success stems from the engagement and collaboration with politicians, developers and land owners.” The Sydney Fish Market won as the project transforms a world bigger then itself. The architects executed their role in an exemplary and inspiring fashion.

Small Project of the Year:

Streetlight Tagpuro; Tacloban, Philippines / Eriksson Furunes + Leandro V. Locsin

Streetlight Tagpuro; Tacloban, Philippines / Eriksson Furunes + Leandro V. Locsin. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

Streetlight Tagpuro; Tacloban, Philippines / Eriksson Furunes + Leandro V. Locsin. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

“A genuine good news story, whereby a community engagement process led to an authentic and high quality result.”  The project involved the relocation of NGO Streetlight’s office, orphanage and study centre in the wake of super-typhoon Haiyan. 

Landscape of the Year:

The Recovered Archaeological Landscape of Chengtoushan; Lixian County, China / Turenscape

The Recovered Archaeological Landscape of Chengtoushan; Lixian County, China / Turenscape. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

The Recovered Archaeological Landscape of Chengtoushan; Lixian County, China / Turenscape. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

The judges felt that this project reflected a hopeful and creative mixture of archaeological history, rice production and tourism.  The landscape project is based around a live 6,500 year-old archaeological site which has been protected by the local government of this rural province.  The judges were impressed with the “productive engagement between visitors and farmers who are able to maintain their traditional livelihoods”.  

Iran Special Prize for Completed Buildings:

Pars Hospital; Rasht, Iran / New Wave Architecture

Pars Hospital; Rasht, Iran / New Wave Architecture. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

Pars Hospital; Rasht, Iran / New Wave Architecture. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

The project topped a shortlist of eight Iranian projects. Completed in 2016, the hospital was praised by judges as “a design that understands and confidently solves the puzzle of a large hospital and reaches a resolution of public spaces, links and views that makes a delightfully coloured and light place of repair and recovery.”

Best Use of Colour:

Fitzroy Crossing Renal Hostel, Australia / Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects

Fitzroy Crossing Renal Hostel; Fitzroy Crossing, Australia / Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

Fitzroy Crossing Renal Hostel; Fitzroy Crossing, Australia / Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects. Image Courtesy of World Architecture Festival

The judges found the use of colour to be “sensitive, elegant and well balanced.” The building provides a long term accommodation facility for Aboriginal people from outlaying communities receiving renal dialysis. The aim of the centre is to humanely support the needs of the residents, who may be self sufficient and independent, or may have a carer living with them. The architecture facilitates a safe environment to wander and gather with occupants, family, friends and the community. Light is filtered through the coloured screens that run along the side of the structure. Judges praised the practice for “a design that uses holistically integrated colour relative to the landscape and the local community. As the project’s main function is healing, the use of colour creates an emotional context that is deeply supportive and nurturing.”

See the Day 1 category winners here, and Day 2 winners, here.

News and project descriptions via WAF.

10 Excellent Examples of Works That Adopt the Use of Containers

With the green premise growing in popularity across the globe, more and more people are turning to recycling shipping containers as a way to reduce the extremely high surplus of empty shipping containers that are just waiting to become a home, office, apartment, school, dormitory, studio, emergency shelter, or anything else. The conversion of shipping containers to living spaces is not a new concept.

Shipping containers have become a more common architectural tool over the past few years. Through clippings, insertion of external elements, coatings, and equipment, the container is adapted according to its future use and desired aesthetics. See below 10 examples of works that adopt the use of containers.

1. Decameron / Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan

© Pedro Vannucchi

© Pedro Vannucchi

2. Caterpillar House / Sebastián Irarrázaval

© Sergio Pirrone

© Sergio Pirrone

3. Grillagh Water House / Patrick Bradley Architects

© Aidan Monaghan Photography

© Aidan Monaghan Photography

4. Container Studio / Maziar Behrooz Architecture

Courtesy of Maziar Behrooz Architecture

Courtesy of Maziar Behrooz Architecture

5. Alphaville Store – Contain[it] / SuperLimão Studio

© Maira Acayaba

© Maira Acayaba

6. Container House / José Schreiber Arquitecto

© Ramiro Sosa

© Ramiro Sosa

7, Container Guest House / Poteet Architects

© Chris Cooper

© Chris Cooper

8, Incubo House / María José Trejos

© Sergio Pucci

© Sergio Pucci

9. Prairie Logic / el dorado

© Mike Sinclair

© Mike Sinclair

10. Container Art / Bernardes Jacobsen

© Leonardo Finotti

© Leonardo Finotti

Enrique Martnez Building / Proyecto C

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

  • Architects: Proyecto C
  • Location: Gral. Enrique Martnez 1467, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Architects In Charge: Sebastin Cseh, Juan Cruz Catania
  • Project Team: Natalia Del Giudice, Pablo Bontempo, Juan Ignacio Massa, Nicols Vicens.
  • Area: 3740.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photography: Gustavo Sosa Pinilla
  • General Construction Manager: Horacio Bontempo
  • Structural Engineering: Pedro Gea
  • Sanitary Advisor: Labonia & Asoc.

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

From the architect. In a large plot of land in the neighborhood of Belgrano a low-scale building is project, intended for multifamily housing, that typologically alternates 15 units of various sizes. The architectural structure is developed looking for the preservation of a special inherited element: an old oak near the internal front line.

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

First Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

A specially designed core achieves four units per floor, all with private palier in the type plants (1st to 3rd). In the front, three-bedroom units with wide living rooms are developed and the back-side presents units of 4 bedrooms and large terraces. The latter are removed from the second floor to make room for the existing oak.

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

As the final finish of the project, retreats and outdoor terraces generates diverse external situations. On the fourth floor, the front retreat conceives a single three-bedroom apartment with a desk and a horizontally elongated living room. While two three-bedroom units with their own terraces are developed to the quiet part of the building.

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

The interior design offers free and bright spaces, generating a sense of spaciousness, functionalism and comfort.In the ground floor and subsoil there are 24 parking spaces and at the end of the lot a complementary construction of picturesque character is put in value, functionalizing it to serve as support to the existing pool.

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

The front facade is proposed to strengthen the horizontal proportion of the building through a concrete grid that emphasizes the horizontal lines and a neutral and uniform ground floor enclosure in all its extension.

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

In the quiet part of the building the same criterion is used, but generating a withdrawal of the expansions that leaves the protagonism to the oak.

 Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

Gustavo Sosa Pinilla

In A Male Dominated Field, Women Make Up Only 30% of Architects in USA

via Flowing Data

via Flowing Data

Nathan Yaucollected US Census databetween1950 and 2015to create a set of visualizations thatdemonstrate how the diversity of the workforce has evolved. “Naturally, men and women now work many of the same jobs, but many jobs are mostly men or mostly women,” explains Yau. So how does the architecture profession fit into this narrative?

Data from the 2015American Community Survey revealed the “most male” and “most female” jobs (carpenter and preschool/kindergarten teachers, respectively). It’s not entirely surprising that architects fall towards the male spectrum, butthis interactive graphic allows you to explore other professions and the share of men and women who labor in these fields. While exact numbers aren’t available, the data shows that only 30%-35% of architects in the United States are female.

via Flowing Data

via Flowing Data

via Flowing Data

via Flowing Data

Which professions have a similar male/female breakdown? Emergency Medical Technicians, Environmental Scientists, and Morticians/Funeral Directors.

Yau also compiled 65 years of data to show changing proportions of males and females in specific workforces. As shown in the graph below, architecture is making a slow but determined march towards a 50-50 split. When assessed against other professions-such as model makers (“Woodworkers Including Model Makers and Patternmakers, Misc.”) which is, according toYau’s data, becoming less gender diverse-thisis a comparatively positive statistic.

via Flowing Data

via Flowing Data

Visit “Most Female and Male Occupations Since 1950: The shifting majorities of the sexes in the workplace” to search for other professions and explore Yau’s interactive data visualizations.

Lightspeed Office / ACDF Architecture

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams

  • Architects: ACDF Architecture
  • Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Lead Architects: Maxime-Alexis Frappier, Joan Renaud, Laure Giordani, Christelle Montreuil Jean-Pois, Francis Brodeur, Jrme Deschenaux, Neil Melendez
  • Area: 1200.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Adrien Williams
  • Mechanical/Electrical Engineer: Stantec
  • General Contractor: Anjinnov
  • Furniture: Haworth

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams

From the architect. Lightspeed commissioned ACDF Architecture the designers for the first phase of the firm’s headquarters to create a new floor dedicated to product development. The workspace of the point-of-sale software company is located on the ground floor of a 19th-century railway hotel, the chateau-style Viger Railway Station. With its distinctive architecture and its historical significance, the building is an iconic landmark that stands out in Old Montreal‘s skyline.

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams

Inspired by the contrast between the historic railway station and the growing tech company, ACDF created a functional and lively office space. The new floor provides an ideal environment for development teams, expressing at the same time the audacious and creative nature of Lightspeed. The offices occupy a large and bright 15-foot-high space. Daylight reflects off the slick surfaces of the glossy white epoxy-coated floor and the gypsum ceiling. The harmonious setting creates a unique synergy driven by spontaneous interaction.

Diagram Detail

Diagram Detail

Inspired by the best product development approaches, Lightspeed encourages collaboration and self-organization amongst its team members. Each group works as a unit, almost like an independent start-up company, and the collaborators adapt the space to fit their needs. Each group has its own desks, meeting room and social area in the open floor plan. Varying pastel tones spread on the walls and floors in shadow-like shapes, defining each team’s zone.

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams

Like small islands, these areas form a dynamic archipelago that invites gatherings to take place in the in-between spaces and the surrounding pastel walls double as whiteboards for impromptu meetings and presentations. The flexible environment helps team members to focus on projects in progress while also fostering close working relationships.

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams

Following in the footsteps of their design for the first floor, ACDF opted for a careful intervention that preserves the original building’s rich heritage. Remnants of the existing shell offer a backdrop to the contemporary atmosphere of the office space. The architects uncovered remaining bricks and stones to expose the raw material and created a dynamic contrast between old rough walls and new rectilinear geometry that highlights the space’s qualities.

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams

Passing through the old central wall, we reach the alley, a common space where the industrial past of the building is more noticeable. The glossy floor finish of this area exposes the concrete and terrazzo patterns. The black paint on the ceiling conceals the ducts and piping without hiding them completely. Located at the junction between the 1898 Viger Railway Station and the 1912 Berri Railway Station, the alley is a space where eras and people meet.

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams

With its comfortable atmosphere and its long counters calibrated for large-size gatherings, the room can accommodate up to 300 people and can provide a meeting place for the whole Lightspeed team. The central position of the alley divides the floor in two: a clean and edgy space on one side, an industrial environment on the other. Adapted to the visionary work of development teams, the new floor of Lightspeed’s office is a real innovation hub, while also providing an engaging and inspiring workspace.

 Adrien Williams

Adrien Williams