The New Yorker Cartoon That Accompanied the Opening of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim

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Courtesy of The New Yorker

From wonderment to disgust, the opening of Solomon R. Guggenheim Museumby Frank Lloyd Wrightin 1959 was met with a wide range of reactions from the public. This profound cultural moment was distilled in a series of witty cartoons published in the New Yorkerthat simultaneously lampooned both the innovative architecture and its critics, which were recentlyshared in a blog postby the Guggenheim Museum. Through detailed sketches, cartoonist Alan Dunn represents the experience of the building, from staring into the exterior porthole windows to walking around the grand ramp. In one drawing he depicts the perspective from the first floor looking up at the dome, giving a sweeping sense of the curvature and geometries of the building.

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Courtesy of The New Yorker

In addition to showing the architecture, Dunn includes dialogue from the museum guests that hints at their astonishment or skepticism about the building. The quips bring a sense of humor to the cartoons along with honest observations: vignettes such as the man peeking aroundthe painting hanging off the curved wall exemplify the disorientation that some viewers felt. Through Dunn’s cartoons of the Guggenheim, he reminds us of the timeless combination of excitement and hesitance that comes with first encountering unprecedented works of architecture.

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Courtesy of The New Yorker

To learn more about the New Yorker’s Guggenheim cartoon and see more of the original drawings, read the original article by Caitlin Dover here.

White Kitchens With A Retro Pop

White kitchens have been on trend for a while now. I think they are timeless and will probably never go out of style, kinda like a classic pair of blue jeans. Let’s be honest though, basic white kitchens can get boring. To pump up the personality of a white kitchen,you need to put some thought into the other choices going into the space like the appliances, cabinet door styles, backsplashand counter selections that can take the blah out and deliver some needed pizazz.

Via Houzz
So I’m thinking, why not go from the ordinary to the extraordinarywith retro appliances that add a little zhush and confidence to an all white kitchen? I’m talking aboutappliances that call attention to themselves as soon as guests enter the room unique options like those from Elmira Stove Worksthat recall the automobiles of the 1950s with big tail fins and elongated chrome.

The 1939 Hambly house interior showcases a clean, minimalist millwork where your eye goes directly to the appliances.

Hambly house. Credit:Elmira Stoveworks
The turquoise Northstar stove and fridge from the owners former home was actually the starting point for the kitchen design.

Hambly house. Credit:Elmira Stoveworks

The Northstar ranges not only look retro but seriously perform up to modern standards with 15,000 BTU gas burners, 2500-watt high speed radiant elements, standard self-cleaning ovens, programmable delayed bake capability, true convection ovens and a two-cubic foot warmer. The control elements under the ceramic top model provide quick, precise cooking and easy clean up too. I love the timeless styling with state-of-the-art convenience and performance features.

Via Houzz

White-on-white is the theme in the kitchen above. With their retro styling and hardware, the white Northstar appliances nicely complement the black and white checkerboard floors and natural stone countertops.

If you’re looking for your perfect kitchen, Elmira has an easy way to help you achieve it. Their interactive online kitchen configurator tool lets you create your dream kitchen so you can get an idea of how Elmira’s vintage inspired kitchen appliances can be applied in your space. Clickhere to try it out!

Connect with Elmira Stove Works on theirWEBSITE,FACEBOOK,PINTEREST

All Images courtesy of Elmira StoveWorks

Thanks in part to Elmira Stove Works for sponsoring this post. All opinions are mine.

Showvila La Pineda / Jaime Prous Architects

 Roger Casas

Roger Casas

  • Architects: Jaime Prous Architects
  • Location: Caldes de Malavella, Provincia de Girona, Espaa
  • Architect In Charge: Jaime Prous Martin
  • Rigger: Jordi Chopo
  • Area: 320.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: Roger Casas
  • Structure Engineer: Eduard Bonmat
  • Mechanical Engineer: Xavier Arnal
  • Project Manager: Arnau Blancafort
  • Main Contractor: Construccions Rubau

 Roger Casas

Roger Casas

From the architect. Caldes de Malavella, Girona. February the 30th of 2017. Isolated from the hustle and bustle of the city and completely integrated in the natural surrounding of the region, we can find the Villas La Pineda: generously sized homes designed by Jaime Prous Architects for the PGA Catalonia Resport complex. This latest design is incorporated into an idyllic residential development that combines the well-being of a modern and Mediterranean lifestyle in harmony with the environment, with maximum comfort and privacy.

 Roger Casas

Roger Casas

Located in a privileged landscape dominated by a rich indigenous vegetation, the villas are immersed in the climate and nature of the region. Two main volumes connected through a glass vestibule form each house. The L-shaped plan generates a central patio that allows the landscape to penetrate inside.

 Roger Casas

Roger Casas

From the main entrance, you can appreciate the delicacy of local materials such as wood, autochthonous stone and white walls providing a feeling of warmth and comfort from the outset. The pergolas enlarge the size of the house fusing it with the landscape and sifting the sun creating an interplay of light and shade.The house is divided into three levels. The basement is dedicated to the technical areas like garage, laundry, storage and engine room. On the ground floor are the main master suite and the living-dining- kitchen, bathed by natural light thanks to sliding windows that disappear on the wall and expand the space towards the garden and pool. The first floor has three rooms of which a suite with privileged views over the golf course.

Lower Plan

Lower Plan

The outdoor space, characterized by its pergola flying above the pool integrated in the garden, is the ideal scenario for long days of leisure and relaxation at any time of the year.

 Roger Casas

Roger Casas

Jaime Prous Architects’ team presents this set of houses that through rules of aggregation achieve unique and exclusive villas within a harmonic ensemble where privacy and relation with nature are guaranteed.

 Roger Casas

Roger Casas

UNStudio Designs Teflon Pavilion to Test Concepts for Extraterrestrial Living

 Olaf Becker

Olaf Becker

Designed by UNStudioin collaboration withMDT-tex, Prototype II is a modular membrane structure that recently premiered at Techtexil’s Living in Space exhibition. Providing a space at the exhibition for visitors to experience a Virtual Reality trip to Mars created by European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). UNStudio and MDT-tex have previously teamed up on temporary envelope exhibits before; their contorting LED-backlit biomimetic Eye_Beaconpavilion debuted at the Amsterdam Light Festival late last year.

 Olaf Becker

Olaf Becker

Whereas Eye_Beacon featured a facade of stretched textile modules, Prototype II is cocooned in a performance-oriented PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) membrane (more commonly known as Teflon) designed to cope with extreme weather conditions. The two projects serve as proof of concept for an upcoming multi-functional membrane building envelope system co-developed by UNStudio and MDT-tex called Cirrus.

 Olaf Becker

Olaf Becker

Courtesy of MDT-tex

Courtesy of MDT-tex

While MDT-tex‘s PTFE would undoubtedly make for a striking building facade, the material also possesses extraordinary properties that make for a legitimately plausible structure for use on the Moon or on Mars. Unlike typical Teflon textiles or PVC-coated polyester fabrics, MDT-tex‘s PTFE is formed from twisted multi-filament fibers, giving the material exceptional strength and flexibility. Despite being able to enclose a volume of 80 cubic meters, Prototype II is exceedingly lightweight and easy to transport.

 Olaf Becker

Olaf Becker

Structural detail. Image Courtesy of MDT-tex

Structural detail. Image Courtesy of MDT-tex

The PTFE itself provides excellent extraterrestrial protection to its occupants. The material is impervious to drastic temperature swings (it maintains its integrity between -200 and 327 degrees Celsius), is completely non-flammable, and has low electrical and thermal conductivity. The translucent PTFE is even capable of permitting 40% of visual light while filtering out harmful UV radiation.

 Olaf Becker

Olaf Becker

Elevation. Image Courtesy of MDT-tex

Elevation. Image Courtesy of MDT-tex

Design: UNStudio (Ben van Berkel with Rob Henderson, William de Boer, Piotr Kluszczynski, Ke Quan)

Producer:MDT-tex (Markus Mller-Feist, Dr. Shankar Jha, Samer Alqutifani and Gennadi Rosin)

Location: Frankfurt,Germany

Pavilion surface: 51 square meters

Pavilion volume: 80 cubic meters

Pavilion site: 25 square meters